Bel from Audaci’s comment made me thunk and will hopefully change my mindset as I’m woeful at taking my own advice.

But really I should try to be proud of the baby steps of progress so far.  I have learnt stuff, I may not know as much about <insert enzyme/hormone here> as some others but I’m learning stuff.

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and now for something completely different

On another note, i saw Leigh Warren and Dancer’s new piece, Seven at the Adelaide Fringe, which was great. It was terrific seeing my friends perform and obviously relish the performance, though it made me more than a little wistful.  But really, despite the workload and the constant feeling of overload, I’m really enjoying medicine and can look back on my performing fondly and without too much sadness.

I do miss being creative though, and have signed up for our Health and Human Rights Group as junior media rep, which hopefully will prove fun.  The cynic in me says that no way a small bunch of wide eyed med students can never make much of a difference which  is balanced against the wide eyed optimism that the sentiment is worth working for and that we certainly can make a difference to communities in need.

I also miss teaching, I really have to find somewhere to teach…

Bel’s post on the transition from creative industries to medicine made me think over my transition too. (just to add to the list, here is another ex-dancer turned med student)

I enjoyed my time in the arts. I loved it. I loved the camaraderie of creating a performance, performing it, touring with it and growing with it. I loved many of the people I met, I loved the thrill of creating my own work, realising my vision.  I guess why I left was of practicality, and also a feeling that I needed a change.  I was satisfied with what I had done. Like Audaci I can’t quite put my finger on it, but it made sense to me, and it seemed ‘right’ and still does despite my whinging and bitching.

There was certainly an element that it was no longer as fulfilling as it was before. Those who’ve read this for a while know my issues with the whole system of publically funded art, the politics of getting the money and also a certain angst of, what is it, cosmically speaking, all for?  I never did get a good answer to that, but along with a feeling that dancing was no longer the most fun I could have and the very real prospect of being ‘damaged goods’ due to bodgy lungs, it seemed ripe to change.

 “The one thing that art and health have in common is the human experience.  Across both you will see the full spectrum of human suffering and elation.  The former may be a more abstract, disconnected version of, but the link is there.  Across both you will find your mind challenged, twisted in ways you never thought possible, you’re exposed to depths of knowledge hitherto unimagined.  So similar, but so different.  The problem solving too, the starting with nothing and creating a whole picture is so similar.  You need that same arsenal of skills, even though the skills themselves may differ.  And the sense of personal challenge is the same. “

I was just talking about it to a friend of mine, and I really do see a continuum across my eclectic background.  The challenges, the element of the human – its frailty, its beauty and its many faces, the drawing and synthesis of ideas from disparate sources,  the learning, the teaching and sharing of knowledge and experience, it is, as Bel says, same same, but different.

I don’t know if this post makes any sense, but I’ve been trying to get down some thoughts as I muddle my way through this med school thing.

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